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MEC3204 Production Engineering

Semester 2, 2012 On-campus Toowoomba
Units : 1
Faculty or Section : Faculty of Engineering & Surveying
School or Department : Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering
Version produced : 30 December 2013

Contents on this page

Staffing

Examiner: Harry Ku
Moderator: Hao Wang

Other requisites

Recommended prior or concurrent study: MEC2202

Synopsis

The design and organisation of methods used in manufacturing is of fundamental importance to a manufacturing firm. Methods may also be termed the management of a process, the way in which physical facilities are arranged to provide an environment which is inductive to efficient, fast transformation. A measure of this efficiency is the time in which the transformation occurs. Time being one of the critical factors involved in the measurement of productivity. The transformation process requires an exact knowledge of the size, shape and finish desired on the finished product. In manufacturing, the ability to measure accurately both size and form, is of paramount importance to the quality and performance of the end product. Because of the wide diversity of types of processes, materials and products associated with manufacturing, the management function of a firm must be highly organised, efficient and responsive to provide an environment capable of meeting the demands and needs of its customers. Engineers must keep abreast with advancing production and operations techniques to ensure that their products remain competitive. Computer technology has made tremendous inroads into the manufacturing scene over the past decade and firms must incorporate computer monitoring and control in their operations if they are to remain in today's manufacturing arena.

Objectives

The course objectives define the student learning outcomes for a course. On completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. analyse various techniques and carry out a range of practical tests associated with metrology;
  2. explain how the study of methods and work measurement can help the engineer solve many problems associated with the manufacturing environment;
  3. interpret how the functions of production planning and control operate in a manufacturing organisation;
  4. analyse the concept of inventory control and in particular, its application to the ordering and costing of materials in store;
  5. analyse and apply methods for equipment selection and maintenance;
  6. evaluate various layouts associated with manufacturing and explain when and how to apply them;
  7. outline the principles of operation of flexible manufacturing systems, group technology, just in time systems and computer integrated manufacturing;
  8. examine the applications of health and safety management in manufacturing organisations;
  9. evaluate various investment options using net present value.
  10. analyse different types of robots and their application characteristics;
  11. discuss various types of automated material handling systems and their applications in the manufacturing industries;
  12. discuss automated inspection and testing systems and their applications in the manufacturing industries;
  13. discuss various characteristics of automated production lines and their applications in the manufacturing industries.

Topics

Description Weighting(%)
1. Metrology: Linear Measurement Angular Measurement Limit Gauges Machine Tool Testing Gear Measurement Screw Thread Measurement Surface Finish Measurement 15.00
2. Production Systems: Method Study Work Measurement Group Technology, Flexible Manufacturing Systems and Just in Time Equipment Selection and Maintenance Production Planning and Control Factory Location and Layout Computer Integrated Manufacturing Occupational health and safety management Net present value Industrial Robots Automated Material Handling Systems Automated Production Lines 85.00

Text and materials required to be purchased or accessed

ALL textbooks and materials available to be purchased can be sourced from USQ's Online Bookshop (unless otherwise stated). (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/bookweb/subject.cgi?year=2012&sem=02&subject1=MEC3204)

Please contact us for alternative purchase options from USQ Bookshop. (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/contact/)

  • Groover, MP 2008, Automation, production systems and computer integrated manufacturing, 3rd edn, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ.

Reference materials

Reference materials are materials that, if accessed by students, may improve their knowledge and understanding of the material in the course and enrich their learning experience.
  • Kanawaty, G 1992, Introduction to Work Study, 4th edn, International Labour Office, Geneva.

Student workload requirements

Activity Hours
Assessments 30.00
Examinations 2.00
Lectures 26.00
Private Study 71.00
Tutorials 26.00

Assessment details

Description Marks out of Wtg (%) Due Date Notes
ASSIGNMENT 1 100 10 03 Sep 2012
ASSIGNMENT 2 200 20 24 Sep 2012
2 HOUR RESTRICTED EXAMINATION 700 70 End S2 (see note 1)

NOTES
  1. Student Administration will advise students of the dates of their examinations during the semester.

Important assessment information

  1. Attendance requirements:
    It is the students' responsibility to attend and participate appropriately in all activities (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratories and practical work) scheduled for them, and to study all material provided to them or required to be accessed by them to maximise their chance of meeting the objectives of the course and to be informed of course-related activities and administration.

  2. Requirements for students to complete each assessment item satisfactorily:
    To satisfactorily complete an individual assessment item a student must achieve at least 40% of the marks or a grade of at least C-. (Depending upon the requirements in Statement 4 below, students may not have to satisfactorily complete each assessment item to receive a passing grade in this course.)

  3. Penalties for late submission of required work:
    If students submit assignments after the due date without (prior) approval of the examiner then a penalty of 5% of the total marks gained by the student for the assignment may apply for each working day late up to ten working days at which time a mark of zero may be recorded.. No assignments will be accepted after model answers have been posted.

  4. Requirements for student to be awarded a passing grade in the course:
    To be assured of receiving a passing grade in a course a student must obtain at least 50% of the total weighted marks for the course.

  5. Method used to combine assessment results to attain final grade:
    The final grades for students will be assigned on the basis of the weighted aggregate of the marks (or grades) obtained for each of the summative assessment items in the course.

  6. Examination information:
    In a Restricted Examination, candidates are allowed access to specific materials during the examination. The only materials that candidates may use in the restricted examination for this course are: writing materials (non-electronic and free from material which could give the student an unfair advantage in the examination); calculators which cannot hold textual information (students must indicate on their examination paper the make and model of any calculator(s) they use during the examination).

  7. Examination period when Deferred/Supplementary examinations will be held:
    Any Deferred or Supplementary examinations for this course will be held during the examination period at the end of the semester of the next offering of this course.

  8. University Student Policies:
    Students should read the USQ policies: Definitions, Assessment and Student Academic Misconduct to avoid actions which might contravene University policies and practices. These policies can be found at http://policy.usq.edu.au.

Assessment notes

  1. The due date for an assignment is the date by which a student must despatch the assignment to the USQ. The onus is on the student to provide proof of the despatch date, if requested by the Examiner.

  2. Students must retain a copy of each item submitted for assessment. This must be despatched to USQ within 24 hours if required by the Examiner.

  3. In accordance with University Policy, the Examiner may grant an extension of the due date of an assignment in extenuating circumstances.

  4. If electronic submission of assessments is specified for the course, students will be notified of this in the course Introductory Book and on the USQ Study Desk. All required electronic submission must be made through the Assignment Drop Box located on the USQ Study Desk for the course, unless directed otherwise by the examiner of the course. The due date for an electronically submitted assessment is the date by which a student must electronically submit the assignment. The assignment files must be submitted by 11.55pm on the due date using USQ time (as displayed on the clock on the course home page; that is, Australian Eastern Standard Time).

  5. If the method of assessment submission is by written, typed or printed paper-based media students should (i) submit to the Faculty Office for students enrolled in the course in the on-campus mode, or (ii) mail to the USQ for students enrolled in the course in the external mode. The due date for the assessment is the date by which a student must (i) submit the assessment for students enrolled in the on-campus mode, or (ii) mail the assessment for students enrolled in the external mode.

  6. The Faculty will NOT normally accept submission of assessments by facsimile or email.

  7. Students who do not have regular access to postal services for the submission of paper-based assessments, or regular access to Internet services for electronic submission, or are otherwise disadvantaged by these regulations may be given special consideration. They should contact the examiner of the course to negotiate such special arrangements prior to the submission date.

  8. Students who have undertaken all of the required assessments in a course but who have failed to meet some of the specified objectives of a course within the normally prescribed time may be awarded one of the temporary grades: IM (Incomplete - Make up), IS (Incomplete - Supplementary Examination) or ISM (Incomplete -Supplementary Examination and Make up). A temporary grade will only be awarded when, in the opinion of the examiner, a student will be able to achieve the remaining objectives of the course after a period of non directed personal study.

  9. Students who, for medical, family/personal, or employment-related reasons, are unable to complete an assignment or to sit for an examination at the scheduled time may apply to defer an assessment in a course. Such a request must be accompanied by appropriate supporting documentation. One of the following temporary grades may be awarded IDS (Incomplete - Deferred Examination; IDM (Incomplete Deferred Make-up); IDB (Incomplete - Both Deferred Examination and Deferred Make-up).

  10. Harvard (AGPS) is the referencing system required in this course. Students should use Harvard (AGPS) style in their assignments to format details of the information sources they have cited in their work. The Harvard (AGPS) style to be used is defined by the USQ Library's referencing guide.
    http://www.usq.edu.au/library/referencing