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STA2300 Data Analysis

Semester 2, 2012 On-campus Springfield
Units : 1
Faculty or Section : Faculty of Sciences
School or Department : Maths and Computing
Version produced : 30 December 2013

Contents on this page

Staffing

Examiner: Taryn Axelsen
Moderator: Christine McDonald

Other requisites

It is recommended that students have basic computing and numeracy skills.

Rationale

Statistics are pervasive in work and life. Whether it is the planning and implementation of a survey to assess the market penetration of a new product, the design of an experiment to test the efficacy of a new drug, the gathering and summarizing of data provided by a government organization to support an argument or a summary of how well your sports team is doing, data and the discipline of statistics contributes in an essential way. Never before has some understanding of the discipline of statistics been so important to an educated person. Regardless of whether you ever need to initiate the collection or analysis of data in your future studies or future work, some understanding of statistical methods is highly desirable, if not essential, in being able to critically appraise the methods employed by others in generating information of importance to you.

Synopsis

This course provides an understanding of basic statistical concepts and gives practice at some of the methods and skills necessary for students in business, commerce, psychology and the physical sciences to collect, appraise, present, analyse and interpret data. Students are introduced to the basic concepts involved in descriptive and inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed on understanding the basic concepts and principles of dealing with data. Because these concepts and methods are interdisciplinary in nature, students will encounter problems from many sources including their own area of interest. The use of statistical software is a core component of the course. The mathematical underpinning of the methods used are not covered. Other statistics courses deal with this aspect.

Objectives

On completion of this course students will be able to:

  1. make appropriate use of a statistical computer package in entering, summarising and analysing data as relevant to this course;
  2. summarise and describe data using appropriate graphical and numerical tools, and determine association between two variables;
  3. distinguish between the relative advantages and disadvantages of observational and experimental studies;
  4. model appropriate real-life situations using the normal and binomial models;
  5. identify and apply the key concepts of randomness in data collection and production;
  6. apply appropriately the methods of hypothesis testing and estimation in real life situations;
  7. demonstrate an understanding of statistical significance.

Topics

Description Weighting(%)
1. Exploring and understanding data: variables and values; types of data; introduction to SPSS; categorical variables; contingency tables. 8.00
2. Describing distributions: quantitative data; graphs of distributions; summary statistics. 6.00
3. Using the normal model: standardising; unstandardising; standard normal curve; using Table Z. 8.00
4. Exploring relationships between variables: scatterplots; correlation and regression; boxplots. 12.00
5. Gathering data: Observational and experimental studies; surveys; sampling methods; principles of good design; causation and confounding. 12.00
6. Randomness and probability: probability rules; events; probability models; means and standard deviation; the binomial model. 10.00
7. Sampling distribution models: proportions and means; standard error; the central limit theorem. 6.00
8. Generalising to the World at Large: introduction to hypothesis testing and confidence intervals; the sign test; sample size determination. 14.00
9. Hypothesis testing for proportions and means z-test for proportion; one sample t-procedure for a mean; confidence intervals; level of significance; type I and type II errors. 8.00
10. Comparing means: two sample t-procedures; independent and dependent samples; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. 8.00
11. Chi-square testing: test of independence; follow-up analysis. 8.00

Text and materials required to be purchased or accessed

ALL textbooks and materials available to be purchased can be sourced from USQ's Online Bookshop (unless otherwise stated). (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/bookweb/subject.cgi?year=2012&sem=02&subject1=STA2300)

Please contact us for alternative purchase options from USQ Bookshop. (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/contact/)

  • De Veaux, RD, Velleman, PF & Bock, DE 2009, Intro Stats, 3rd edn, Pearson Addison Wesley, Boston.
    (Or equivalent 2nd edition.)
  • SPSS Student Version 18.0 (Version 17.0 or later is acceptable) for Windows, Prentice Hall. (Available separately or bundled with De Veaux, Velleman & Bock) (Note: OnCampus students have access to this software in campus computer laboratories and are not required to purchase SPSS).
  • The course StudyDesk provides all ancillary study material.

Reference materials

Reference materials are materials that, if accessed by students, may improve their knowledge and understanding of the material in the course and enrich their learning experience.

Student workload requirements

Activity Hours
Assessments 30.00
Examinations 2.00
Lectures 26.00
Practical Classes or Workshops 2.00
Private Study 84.00
Tutorials 26.00

Assessment details

Description Marks out of Wtg (%) Due Date Notes
ASSIGNMENT 1 10 5 27 Jul 2012
ASSIGN 2 ON TOPICS 1 TO 6 100 20 03 Sep 2012
ASSIGN 3 UP TO & INC TOP 10 100 25 15 Oct 2012
CMA ON TOPIC 11 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 1)
CMA ON TOPIC 4 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 2)
CMA ON TOPIC 5 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 3)
CMA ON TOPIC 6 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 4)
CMA ON TOPIC 7 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 5)
CMA ON TOPIC 8 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 6)
CMA ON TOPICS 1-3 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 7)
CMA ON TOPICS 9-10 10 0 09 Nov 2012 (see note 8)
EXAM PTA 2HR RESTRICTED 20 20 End S2 (see note 9)
PTB OF ABOVE 2HR REST EXAM 30 30 End S2

NOTES
  1. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  2. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  3. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  4. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  5. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  6. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  7. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  8. CMA's are open for submission until the end of semester of offer. CMAs are marked for the purpose of feedback, but they are not counted towards the final grade.
  9. Examination dates will be available during the semester. Please refer to the examination timetable when published.

Important assessment information

  1. Attendance requirements:
    It is the students' responsibility to attend and participate appropriately in all activities (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratories and practical work) scheduled for them, and to study all material provided to them or required to be accessed by them to maximise their chance of meeting the objectives of the course and to be informed of course-related activities and administration.

  2. Requirements for students to complete each assessment item satisfactorily:
    To satisfactorily complete an assessment item a student must achieve at least 50% of the marks or a grade of at least C-. Students do not have to satisfactorily complete each assessment item to be awarded a passing grade in this course. Refer to Statement 4 below for the requirements to receive a passing grade in this course.

  3. Penalties for late submission of required work:
    If students submit assignments after the due date without (prior) approval of the examiner then a penalty of 5% of the total marks gained by the student for the assignment may apply for each working day late up to ten working days at which time a mark of zero may be recorded. No assignments will be accepted after model answers or solutions have been posted.

  4. Requirements for student to be awarded a passing grade in the course:
    To be assured of receiving a passing grade a student must achieve at least 50% of the total weighted marks available for the course.

  5. Method used to combine assessment results to attain final grade:
    The final grades for students will be assigned on the basis of the aggregate of the weighted marks obtained for each of the summative assessment items in the course.

  6. Examination information:
    Candidates are allowed access only to specific materials during a Restricted Examination. The only materials that candidates may use in the restricted examination for this course are: writing materials (non-electronic and free from material which could give the student an unfair advantage in the examination); calculators which do not hold textual information (students must indicate on their examination paper the make and model of any calculator(s) they use during the examination). One A4 sheet of paper, written or typed on one or both sides with any material the student wishes to include (students are required to submit this sheet of paper with the examination paper, but it will not contribute to marks for the course). Formula sheets will be provided with the examination paper. Students whose first language is not English, may, with the Examiner's approval, take an appropriate non-electronic translation dictionary (but not technical dictionary) into the examination. Students who wish to use a translation dictionary MUST request and receive written approval from the Examiner at least one week before the examination date. Translation dictionaries will be subject to perusal and may be removed from the candidate's possession until appropriate disciplinary action is completed if found to contain material that could give the candidate an unfair advantage.

  7. Examination period when Deferred/Supplementary examinations will be held:
    Any Deferred or Supplementary examinations for this course will be held during the examination period at the end of the semester of the next offering of this course.

  8. University Student Policies:
    Students should read the USQ policies: Definitions, Assessment and Student Academic Misconduct to avoid actions which might contravene University policies and practices. These policies can be found at http://policy.usq.edu.au.

Assessment notes

  1. The due date for an assignment is the date by which a student must despatch the assignment to the USQ. The onus is on the student to provide proof of the despatch date, if requested by the Examiner. Students must retain a copy of each item submitted for assessment. This should be despatched to USQ within 24 hours of receipt of a request to do so. In accordance with University Policy, the Examiner may grant an extension of the due date of an assignment in extenuating circumstances.

  2. The referencing system to be used in this course is supported by the Department. Information on this referencing system and advice on how to use it can be found in the course materials.