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Michael Sankey and Petrea Redmond discuss the value of Camtasia Relay

Michael:
Thanks for joining us, I have with me Dr Petrea Redmond from the Faculty of Education and Petrea’s specialty is in ICT Integration and also in the secondary curriculum and pedagogy. So thanks for joining us Petrea. We are talking this morning about the use Camtasia Relay, the lecture capture software. Can you tell us why you use Camtasia Relay?

Petrea:
Well I found that in my tutorials I frequently didn’t just go by a powerpoint. I went out and looked at systems such as our study desk and websites or other areas and Adobe Presenter didn’t enable me to capture that so I wanted to be able to capture as much of what I do in my tutorials for my online students as possible.

Michael:
But a 2 hour lecture could be really boring. How do you kind of break that up or do you break it up?

Petrea:
I do break it up. I’ve tried a few different ways by literally pacing myself and going, A, B, and C and stopping the recording at that point and then moving on. I’ve also tried just using the pause button when the students are involved in activities. This is not like a formal lecture, it is more like a workshop that has some lecture materials embedded in it but it is moving out from me talking to the students working, to me talking to the students working – so it moves in and out. So a 3 hour session probably records for about an hour to an hour and a half maximum even though it’s within the same session period.

Michael:
So you then break that up into bits so they can access the bits?

Petrea:
Yes

Michael:
What about some tips for those who have never used it or may look to use it.

Petrea:
I think to just have a go to start with and listen to yourself to see what works for you because we all do things very differently and depending on the availability of the microphone you may have and if your students are speaking and you want to respond to the students, you need to make sure you actually repeat the question so the audience who are online can hear what you are responding to. That was probably the biggest learning curve for me to continually repeat things that the audience had said. The other thing I think is probably try and not make it a huge, long event. Try to chop it up into smaller pieces. Although we haven’t got any statistical information that says how long those pieces should be and it might depend on your students and the way your course runs as to what is best for you.

Michael:
Thanks – that was really interesting.

Petrea:
You’re welcome.