USQ LogoCourse specification
The current and official versions of the course specifications are available on the web at //www.usq.edu.au/course/specification/current.
Please consult the web for updates that may occur during the year.

SOC8000 Identity, Self and Society

Semester 1, 2011 Online Toowoomba
Units : 1
Faculty or Section : Faculty of Arts
School or Department : School of Humanities and Communication

Contents on this page

Staffing

Examiner: Malcolm Brown
Moderator: Bryce Barker

Requisites

Pre-requisite: Students must be enrolled in Program: MSTA

Rationale

This course makes it possible to study social science at an advanced (Masters) level, through an examination of some ways in which society is internalised within the individual. To this end, we will examine how apparently private and personal understandings of self and identity can be investigated for their social significance. This will be achieved through an investigation of the meanings attached to concepts of self and identity through theoretical and empirical studies.

Synopsis

This course introduces Honours students to a range of social-scientific studies that offer understandings of selfhood, and the relationship between individuals, groups and social institutions. It consists of two halves:
Part A - Social identities: issues and applications (e.g. national and ethnic identities, class consciousness, gendered identities, identity politics);
Part B - Concepts of selfhood: major traditions (e.g. interaction and performance, discourse, reflexivity and the postmodern self).

Objectives

On successful completion of this course students will be able to:
At the end of this module, students will:

These objectives are in keeping with USQ?s Graduate Attributes; particularly discipline expertise, global citizenship and scholarship and lifelong learning, and with the set of skills that will help to attain the qualities of a USQ graduate, especially cultural literacy.

  1. know how understandings of self and identity can be investigated for their social significance;
  2. be able to investigate and identify the meanings attached to concepts of self and identity through theoretical and empirical studies;
  3. have critically analysed the significance of class, national and ethnic identities in modern Australia and the modern world;
  4. empathically understand (in the sense of sociological concept of Verstehen) the importance of gendered identities in global and culturally diverse contexts;
  5. be familiar with concepts of selfhood in some of the major social-scientific traditions;
  6. be able to apply their social-scientific knowledge and understanding to concepts of self and understanding that may be culturally unfamiliar.

Topics

Description Weighting(%)
1. Introduction 4.00
2. Part A ? Social identities: issues and applications (e.g. national and ethnic identities, class consciousness, gendered identities, identity politics) 46.00
3. Part B ? Concepts of selfhood: major traditions (e.g. interaction and performance, discourse, reflexivity and the postmodern self) 46.00
4. Conclusion 4.00

Text and materials required to be purchased or accessed

ALL textbooks and materials available to be purchased can be sourced from USQ's Online Bookshop (unless otherwise stated). (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/bookweb/subject.cgi?year=2011&sem=01&subject1=SOC8000)

Please contact us for alternative purchase options from USQ Bookshop. (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/contact/)

  • SOC4000 Book of Selected Readings.

Reference materials

Reference materials are materials that, if accessed by students, may improve their knowledge and understanding of the material in the course and enrich their learning experience.
  • Bourdieu, Pierre 1984, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste, Routledge, London.
  • Eliot, Anthony 2001, Concepts of the Self, Polit Press, Cambridge.
  • Goffman, Erving 1971, The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Penguin, Harmondsworth.
  • Hutchison, John and Smith, Anthony D. (eds) 1994, Nationalism, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Hutchison, John and Smith, Anthony D. (eds) 1996, Ethnicity, Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Jackson, Stevie and Scott, Sue 2001, Gender: a Sociological Reader, Routledge, London.
  • Jenkins, Richard 2008, Social Identity, 3rd edn, Routledge, London.
  • Miles, Robert and Brown, Malcolm 2003, Racism (Second edition, Routledge, London.
  • Rabinow, Paul (ed.) 1991, The Foucault Reader, Penguin, London.
  • Wright, Eric Olin 2000, Class Counts, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
    (USQ Library e-Book.)
  • More materials will be recommended nearer to the beginning of the course.

Student workload requirements

Activity Hours
Lectures and Tutorials 26.00
Private Study 124.00

Assessment details

Description Marks out of Wtg (%) Due Date Notes
PARTICIPATION IN ONLINE DISCUS 100 10 28 Feb 2011 (see note 1)
ASSIGNMENT 2- ESSAY ON PART B 100 45 11 Apr 2011 (see note 2)
ASSIGNMENT 1- ESSAY ON PART A 100 45 15 Apr 2011 (see note 3)

NOTES
  1. Participation. Students are expected to contribute to online discussions each week. These contributions will be recorded on a weekly basis and the total mark calculated at the end of the semester. This assessment is aligned with all objectives.
  2. Assignment 2 - Essay on Part B. Each student will write an essay relating to Part B of the course from a list of options provided by the course lecturer or examiner. Any student may negotiate with the course examiner to write an essay on a different topic of the student's own choosing, as long as the chosen topic is, in the opinion of the course examiner, clearly related to Part B of the course. This assessment is aligned with objectives 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6.
  3. Assignment 1 - Essay on Part A. Each student will write an essay relating to Part A of the course from a list of options provided by the course lecturer or examiner. Any student may negotiate with the course examiner to write an essay on a different topic of the student's own choosing, as long as the chosen topic is, in the opinion of the course examiner, clearly related to Part A of the course. This assessment is aligned with objectives 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6.