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SOC1001 Conflict and Peace

Semester 2, 2016 External
Units : 1
Faculty or Section : Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts
School or Department : School of Arts and Communication
Student contribution band : Band 1
ASCED code : 090399 - Studies in Human Society n.e.c

Contents on this page

Staffing

Examiner: Malcolm Brown

Other requisites

Students will require access to e-mail and have internet access to UConnect for this course.

Rationale

This is the foundation course for the social justice major. Social justice aims to introduce students to non-violent social structures and how they transform traditional hierarchical structures, and to the importance of human rights and eco-sustainability in building a peaceful society.

Synopsis

This is the foundation course for the social justice major. It establishes the parameters of the field of Social Justice and begins by introducing students to the concepts of negative peace - the absence of war and civil strife - and positive peace which is founded upon a just society and global community. It will explore these concepts from the global to the personal and develop student skills in negotiation, non-violent resistance, empathy and conflict resolution. Social justice aims to introduce students to non-violent social structures and how they transform traditional hierarchical structures, and to the importance of human rights and eco-sustainability in building a peaceful society. This course will introduce students to key concepts in social justice from an international, national, local and personal perspective.

Objectives

On successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. recognise, define, and use the essential terminology of peace and conflict studies
  2. analyse the causes of conflict
  3. illustrate a deep understanding of nonviolence in theory and practice through selected case studies
  4. make judgments about ways to achieve peaceful outcomes through negotiation, compromise or conflict resolution techniques
  5. display an understanding of empathy with others
  6. critically analyse rhetoric
  7. appreciate the need for peace to incorporate both positive and negative forms.

Topics

Description Weighting(%)
1. Module 1: Conflict resolution and management, applications and conclusions 25.00
2. Module 2: Introduction to social justice: key concepts, negative and positive peace, causes of war and social conflict 15.00
3. Module 3: Analysis of violence, conflict and peace: feminist understandings of violence, political economy and development, the environment 30.00
4. Module 4: Institutional peace: control of military power, human rights, self-determination and international order 15.00
5. Module 5: Peace as a way of life: nonviolence, peace movements 15.00

Text and materials required to be purchased or accessed

ALL textbooks and materials available to be purchased can be sourced from USQ's Online Bookshop (unless otherwise stated). (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/bookweb/subject.cgi?year=2016&sem=02&subject1=SOC1001)

Please contact us for alternative purchase options from USQ Bookshop. (https://bookshop.usq.edu.au/contact/)

  • Jeong, HW 2000, Peace and conflict studies: an introduction, Ashgate, Aldershot.

Reference materials

Reference materials are materials that, if accessed by students, may improve their knowledge and understanding of the material in the course and enrich their learning experience.
  • Barash, DP & Webel, CP 2014, Peace and conflict studies, 3rd edn, Sage, Thousand Oaks.
    (This is commonly used as a textbook for university courses in Social justice, but it is expensive. If you are doing the Social justice major, however, you may like to consider buying a copy.)
  • Barash, DP (ed.) 2014, Approaches to peace: a reader in peace studies, 3rd edn, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
  • Juergensmeyer, M 2005, Gandhi?s way: a handbook of conflict resolution, University of California Press, Berkeley.
  • Kurlansky, M 2006, Non-violence: the history of a dangerous idea, Jonathan Cape, London.
  • Schirch, L 2005, Ritual and symbol in peacebuilding, Kumarian Prress, Bloomfield, CT.
    (Available as an eBook through the library catalogue.)

Student workload expectations

Activity Hours
Directed Study 26.00
Examinations 2.00
Online Discussion Groups 13.00
Private Study 114.00

Assessment details

Description Marks out of Wtg (%) Due Date Notes
ONLINE DISCUSS'N & PARTIC 100 20 21 Oct 2016 (see note 1)
JOURNAL 100 40 28 Oct 2016
EXAM 100 40 End S2 (see note 2)

NOTES
  1. Students will contribute to online discussions commencing in Week 1 and will be assessed on their contribution at the end of the course.
  2. This will be a closed exam. The total working time for the exam is 2 hours. The exam date will be available via UConnect when the official exam timetable has been released.

Important assessment information

  1. Attendance requirements:
    Students must attend and complete the requirements of the Workplace Health and Safety training program for this course where required.

    External and Online:
    There are no attendance requirements for this course. However, it is the students? responsibility to study all material provided to them or required to be accessed by them to maximise their chance of meeting the objectives of the course and to be informed of course-related activities and administration.

    On-campus
    It is the students? responsibility to attend and participate appropriately in all activities (such as lectures, tutorials, laboratories and practical work) scheduled for them, and to study all material provided to them or required to be accessed by them to maximise their chance of meeting the objectives of the course and to be informed of course-related activities and administration.
    .

  2. Requirements for students to complete each assessment item satisfactorily:
    To satisfactorily complete an individual assessment item a student must achieve at least 50% of the marks.

  3. Penalties for late submission of required work:
    Students should refer to the Assessment Procedure http://policy.usq.edu.au/documents.php?id=14749PL (point 4.2.4)

  4. Requirements for student to be awarded a passing grade in the course:
    To be assured of receiving a passing grade a student must achieve at least 50% of the total weighted marks available for the course.

  5. Method used to combine assessment results to attain final grade:
    The final grades for students will be assigned on the basis of the aggregate of the weighted marks obtained for each of the summative assessment items in the course.

  6. Examination information:
    Candidates are allowed to bring only writing and drawing instruments into the Closed examination.

  7. Examination period when Deferred/Supplementary examinations will be held:
    Any Deferred or Supplementary examinations for this course will be held during the next examination period.

  8. University Student Policies:
    Students should read the USQ policies: Definitions, Assessment and Student Academic Misconduct to avoid actions which might contravene University policies and practices. These policies can be found at http://policy.usq.edu.au.

Other requirements

  1. Students can expect that questions in assessment items in this course may draw upon knowledge and skills that they can reasonably be expected to have acquired before enrolling in the course. This includes knowledge contained in pre-requisite courses and appropriate communication, information literacy, analytical, critical thinking, problem solving or numeracy skills. Students who do not possess such knowledge and skills should not expect to achieve the same grades as those students who do possess them.