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ENL3008 Screening Literature: Texts in Adaptation

Units : 1
Faculty or Section : Faculty of Business, Education, Law and Arts
School or Department : School of Humanities & Communication
Student contribution band : Band 1
Grading basis : Graded
Version produced : 26 May 2022

Overview

This course examines the way in which texts change as they move between cultural forms. We consider how the relationship between source text and film can be addressed using theories of adaptation, authorship, identity, intertextuality and genre; and question how ‘classic’ or ‘popular’ adaptations respond to cultural and national narratives. The texts under consideration draw from a range of literary forms including the novel, the graphic novel, television and film. This is a third level course that reinforces the literary skills established in earlier Literature courses, as well as expanding knowledge of key literary texts and their relevance in the contemporary world. The course will have cross-disciplinary appeal for students studying Film and Media, as well as Literature, in the School of Arts and Communication as well as covering texts and approaches relevant for students in the School of Education.

Adaptation Studies is the site of emerging critical and cultural debates about the value and function of Literature in both `classical' and `popular' forms. This course applies new approaches in adaptation theory to several texts to encourage students to develop a more sophisticated understanding of the way form influences meaning; to question the concept of literary `value,' authorship and fidelity; and to engage with notions of metanarrative and intertextual dialogue. Students will be provided with a site where narratives can be analysed comparatively across media (literary, filmic and popular writing) in order to explore the impact of national narratives, historical changes, and cultural influences.

Course offers

Semester Mode Campus
Semester 2, 2022 Online
Date printed 26 May 2022